Kira Johnson Spoke 5 Languages, Raced Cars. She Still Died In Childbirth.

Discussion in 'News - Breaking News & Political Forum' started by Always~Wear~Joy, Oct 19, 2018.

  1. Always~Wear~Joy

    Always~Wear~Joy Well-Known Member

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    Kira Johnson Spoke 5 Languages, Raced Cars, Was Daughter in Law of Judge Glenda Hatchett. She Still Died in Childbirth.
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    Angela Helm

    33 minutes ago
    Filed to:BLACK MATERNAL MORTALITY
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    Kira Johnson
    Screenshot: YouTube
    By all accounts, Kira Johnson could be described as a phenomenal woman. She traveled extensively, spoke five languages, and even raced cars with her adoring husband of 10 years right by her side.

    The mother of one son, 19-month-old Charles Johnson V, Kira and her husband were ecstatic when they found out they were having another boy—they had wanted two back to back.

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    According to her husband Charles Johnson IV, who is the son of Judge Glenda Hatchett, of the nationally syndicated reality court TV show Judge Hatchett, Kira never missed a prenatal appointment and was in excellent health.

    On April 12, 2016, she gave birth to Langston Johnson at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center hospital in Los Angeles, a world renowned health center, but Charles noticed that she was having a difficult recovery. 11 Alive reports:

    He noticed blood in Kira’s catheter. He said he brought it to the attention of the nurses and doctors, and the staff ordered a CT scan.

    “That was supposed to be performed STAT,” Charles said. “In my mind, I’m thinking, ‘That means immediately.’”

    Charles said he repeatedly asked the medical staff for help, but waited for hours.

    “She’s beginning to tremble uncontrollably,” Charles recalled. “She’s beginning to shake. She’s beginning to be in increasingly more pain. She’s becoming sensitive to the touch. There’s still no CT scan.”

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    Charles said a CT was never performed, and they waited seven hours before doctors took her back for an internal exam.

    When they finally did so, Charles said doctors told him “‘She’ll be back in 15 minutes,’” he said. “And that was the last time I saw Kira alive.”

    Kira’s cause of death was from a hemorrhage. Charles said doctors found three liters of blood in Kira’s stomach and her heart stopped.

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    Kira is but one of the hundreds of black women who die in childbirth each year—at rates that dwarf those of their white counterparts—regardless of socioeconomic standing, education or marital status (see Serena Williams’ near-death experience in childbirth or the new report that black women in Illinois are six times more likely to die in childbirth than their white counterparts.)

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    Black moms in Illinois 6 times more likely to die from pregnancy-related conditions


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    As Linda Villarosa reported in her seminal piece earlier this year, “Why America’s Black Mothers and Babies Are in a Life-or-Death Crisis,” the disparity in black women dying in childbirth (which one might have assumed was something from the 19thcentury) has been an issue for at least a century:

    Black women are three to four times as likely to die from pregnancy-related causes as their white counterparts, according to the C.D.C. — a disproportionate rate that is higher than that of Mexico, where nearly half the population lives in poverty — and as with infants, the high numbers for black women drive the national numbers.

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    11 Alive reports that for every 13 white women who die during pregnancy or within one year of giving birth, there are 44 black women. More than half of all deaths have been deemed preventable by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    The reasons for this disparity, which has been studied and debated by researchers and doctors for more than two decades, is not definitely clear, but there is growing evidence that the toxicity of racism—both in the lives of black women and in the medical establishment—plays a large part.

    “For black women in America, an inescapable atmosphere of societal and systemic racism can create a kind of toxic physiological stress, resulting in conditions — including hypertension and pre-eclampsia — that lead directly to higher rates of infant and maternal death,” the article states.

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    People reports that on March 22 of this year, Charles filed a medical malpractice lawsuit against Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, claiming that malpractice in that the medical team did not respond to Kira’s escalating issues in a timely manner.

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    Two years after Johnson’s death, Cedars-Sinai Hospital recently released the following statement:

    Kira Johnson’s death was a tragedy. Her husband, Charles S. Johnson IV, is demonstrating important leadership in raising awareness of preventable maternal deaths. Cedars-Sinai strongly agrees with Mr. Johnson and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists that no mother should die giving birth.

    While federal privacy laws prevent us from responding directly about any patient’s care without written authorization, we can share the following: One of the reasons for Cedars-Sinai’s high quality of care is that we thoroughly investigate any situation where there are concerns about a patient’s medical care. Based on our findings, we make any changes that are needed so that we can continue to provide the highest quality care to our patients. This includes reviewing hospital procedures as well as the competency of healthcare providers.

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    Judge Hatchett, who lives with her son and her two grandsons, believes Kira’s death could have been prevented.

    “They researched, they were in Los Angeles, they knew that Cedar Sinai was a world-class hospital and after she died, they said ‘Oh, had we gotten her back to the operating room she would be perfectly fine. Oh if we had...’ Well, why the hell didn’t they?” Hatchett told 11 Alive. “It was not that she was sick, it’s not that she had a preexisting condition, that she had a heart problem or she had a blood clot, none of that was Kira’s case.”

    “We walked in for what we expected to be the happiest day of our life. And we walked straight into a nightmare,” Charles, now an activist in preventing maternal deaths, especially for black women, said to 11 Alive, “I sit awake at nights thinking maybe I should have grabbed somebody by the collar, maybe I should’ve turned a table over, would that have made a difference? Even two years later, I still can’t make sense of it in my mind.”

     
  2. intellectualuva

    intellectualuva Well-Known Member

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    :cry3:Hospitals do not listen to the concerns of BW. That poor man and their babies.
     
  3. Brownie

    Brownie Well-Known Member

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    Feel bad for the husband...in my case and my family, I’m not going to sit there and wait hours for you to do something STAT; you will be hearing from me every 1/2 hour or more, until my loved one gets the needed care. I agree with what others have said; you have to be the squeaky wheel and advocate for yourself and your family. Don’t assume the doctors/nurses will automatically give you 100%.
     
  4. nysister

    nysister Well-Known Member

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    Oh my heavens. That poor woman. She deserved better. Sigh, this hurt my heart.
     
  5. nysister

    nysister Well-Known Member

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    Sometimes you have to make people hear you. It shouldn't fall upon the patient or their family to do that, but sometimes you have to. Never be afraid to be an advocate for your health or of those you love ladies.

    My very mild husband was 2 minutes from ripping apart a medical office when he thought a procedure I'd gone through had went wrong and they weren't telling him. It's okay to say "sorry" later.
     
  6. Chicoro

    Chicoro Well-Known Member

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    If you've just given birth and you don't feel right go to the hospital. Since racism and stereotyping are part of this, i say leverage it and use it. Not getting a the service you need?

    It's time to get GHETTO! Act ugly, or have a family member act out and ugly on your behalf.

    You can say you're sorry once you are well. You will be forever silenced if you are dead.


    STOP the killing! For every 13 white women who die in childbirth related situations,44 black women die.

    I truly believe these statistics will not change for the better until more black women are doctors.
     
  7. theRaven

    theRaven Well-Known Member

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    That poor woman. I'm tearing up just reading this. I don't understand how
    they had her waiting for hours for a CT scan?
     
  8. Crackers Phinn

    Crackers Phinn Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.

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    See, that's crazy because all of my hypochondria is treated at Cedars and my mother was treated at Cedars. I get everything that I ask for including drugs that I'm probably not supposed to get. I feel bad for the family because this woman's death seems to have been preventable. I'm not going to berate the husband. It was a high stress situation and he probably took a leap of faith that the health care providers in a first rate, top dollar place wouldn't let the medical care get to the kind of sloppy that ended up happening.

    I'm tripping because if you can't trust Cedars then throw all the LA hospitals away cuz it is literally the standard.

    Since I am driven by the fear of having every disease known to man and beast, I will question tf outta the doctors, nurses, candy stripers, etc. and make sure they know that they ain't go quit hearing my mouth until I understand exactly why whatever I'm inquiring about won't kill me.
     
  9. Brownie

    Brownie Well-Known Member

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    :amen:...like not enough. My DH is fairly mild also; going to remind him today to “unmild” himself if I’m ever in the hospital.
     
  10. Chicoro

    Chicoro Well-Known Member

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    Black women in the US, in general, are high context. That means that we like a lot of detail and information, especially from the doctor. I know I can't speak for you, but asking a lot of questions is very common for black woman.
     
  11. Theresamonet

    Theresamonet Well-Known Member

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    I think a lot of black women (and men) lack assertiveness and are positively timid, when outside of their own community (i.e. in the presence of white people). They don't want to cause a ruckus and question authority. Many think being assertive is synonymous with being ghetto or that you have to get ghetto to be assertive.
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2018
  12. TCatt86

    TCatt86 Well-Known Member

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    you know I never thought of that. I remember when I was pregnant every appointment I had my book. I would right out odd things that happened and questions I had anything yhe doctor said. Well my OB ( black woman) never seemed to mention it. One appointment she had an emergency like OBs often do and I had yo see the white female doctor in her office and as soon as I sat down and got my book out, she said "Dr. Hider told me you'd have your book" i never even thought it was anything that needed to be noted
     
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  13. TCatt86

    TCatt86 Well-Known Member

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    Because whenever we get a little passionate we become a threat. We are never allowed to be angry, scared, in pain and express. So we are conditioned to temper ourselves down in mixed company to avoid having law enforcement called on us.
     
  14. SpiritJunkie

    SpiritJunkie Well-Known Member

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    There's a Nielsen Research data that came out recently that states African Americans are the most informed ethinic group that craves information and over index on the rest of the population.

    That being said....speak up...we know more than we think!!

    The conversation needs to continue to educate and inform the medical industry that this has to stop. Our voices are big on Social Media (specifically Twitter). We need to use it to create awareness & mobilize the community around this topic to create change.

    Hurts my heart to read this.
     
  15. Black Ambrosia

    Black Ambrosia Well-Known Member

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    I don't disagree with the comments but there was no way he or his wife could've known initially that what was ailing her was life threatening. 7 hours is too long but you don't know that'll be the case in the first 30 minutes, hour, 2 hours, etc. You think the doctor is coming any minute now. Its only after you've been waiting that you realize there's a need to become the squeaky wheel. What's troubling is that someone inside a hospital and already in their care (as opposed to waiting in the ER) died after they were alerted multiple times of a problem. That's the real issue.
     
  16. Chicoro

    Chicoro Well-Known Member

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    Here's the link to the thread started by @brownb83 about the same topic:

    https://longhaircareforum.com/threa...-and-infant-mortality-for-black-women.831407/

    The thread is entitled, "Stress From Racism Linked to Maternal and Infant Mortality for Black Women".

    Here's a link to the research that @brownb83 also posted in her original thread:

    https://www.americanprogress.org/is...n-americans-high-maternal-infant-death-rates/

    The article is entitled, "Exploring African Americans' High Maternal and Infant Death Rates"
     
  17. Shula

    Shula Well-Known Member

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    This! You must speak up, ladies. And her daytime black nurse told me I wasn't loud or ghetto enough so take it from Chicoro and the black nurses looking out for you.

    I already wrote on here that my kid had a DVT while IN THE HOSPITAL that they said a mere 24-48 hours before would not happen. And this nurse who was so busy asking me about our house and how much we paid for it, had the nerve to tell me that, "I just wanted you to know that IF the doctor doesn't show up, I paged and called him for you; I did both (like that's usual/often??) And it's an emergency?

    Nurse manager had called for transport to get another scan done. I told them she is not going anywhere until you medicate this clot to get her out of risk and give her something for the pain.I had legit walked out of her room to the nurse's station at like 1-2 AM and ANNOUNCED like I had a bullhorn that I would sue everybody present if you don't get this on call doctor up here in 5/10 minutes or less. It worked. The one time I ignored my gut, my kid paid hugely for it and I promised myself never again because I promise you they are either incompetent or racist and both are deadly to us.

    My heart is so broken for this man and his family. She seemed to be quite an amazing and beautiful young woman gone for nothing. And Cedars Sinai is an extraordinary facility. No way he could've seen this coming.
     
  18. Cheleigh

    Cheleigh Well-Known Member

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    I know of another highly educated black woman with no preexisting conditions who died under the care of a black female doctor in childbirth (along with her child) because of a clot or hemorrhage related to the off-label use of a drug. In the moment, it's so hard for you or your family to know that something's amiss.
     
  19. Chicoro

    Chicoro Well-Known Member

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    I agree with you in that it is hard to tell when something is amiss.

    But based on these statistics of super high mortality rates for black women and babies, it is important to be vigilant.

    I say assume that something is and will be amiss in the case of doubt. And be overly cautious. The statistics don't play in black women's favor when it comes down to the outcomes of high risk childbirth.
     
  20. Chicoro

    Chicoro Well-Known Member

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    GHETTO is Good! Especially when it helps to save a precious life. Bravo to you!
     
  21. Everything Zen

    Everything Zen Well-Known Member

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    I don’t like the implications of the title of this thread. As if speaking being multi-lingual and racing cars is going to save a black woman from dying in child birth. It’s problematic in the same vein of the other young socially well connected back woman who died after a night of partying and they tried to “other” her after she wasn’t given the cocaine apartment treatment. :look: They sound like many of the accomplished black women that I know on a regular basis. Yes we are all special and unique and we deserve the world but racism is real. Now when Serena Williams struggles to get doctors to listen to her for a PE post partum or the woman actually an expert in the fieldresearching the topic of black women dying more frequently postpartum that made me sit up and listen. These stories make it seem as if black women DESERVE to be treated like crap oh but not this black women because she spoke 5 languages or not this black woman because she was friends with EJ Johnson. THEY were different than the others :rolleyes: When are we going to recognize that there is little to nothing you can do to protect yourself from racism in the world just like there is little to nothing a woman can do in terms of being butt naked and passed out drunk or sober as a judge in a full burka that if a man wants to rape you he will?
     
  22. LivingInPeace

    LivingInPeace Well-Known Member

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    I think you missed the point.
     
  23. Shula

    Shula Well-Known Member

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    I think what Zen is saying is that this woman SHOULD NOT have to have all these qualifiers and accomplishments listed to prove she was worthy of life. She was worthy simply because all people deserve humane and quality treatment.

    I see both points from you and it's the same thing that happened with Botham Jean and many other blacks dying. It's almost like we have to be proven to be good and accomplished people and not some thug or hoodrat off the street for others to see our value when us simply being human beings should be enough. Unfortunately, this society is so racist towards us that they make it such that we have to be perfect, interesting, productive, etc victims. It's trash thinking but it's also America.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2018
  24. Shula

    Shula Well-Known Member

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    I thought the same thing but left it alone since we ain't post racial yet but it's a running theme for us when death comes for black folk. :angry2: Basically to me it translates to: Was this person a credit to their race and should we even bother to care until we know they weren't trash? Other races have the privilege of empathy and concern when they suffer these things. We gotta pass the checklist. I'm over it, too, sis

    ETA: The cocaine apartment blonde drug addled doc's brush her off and make her a saint treatment was something to watch, eh? White folk are AMAZING and not in a good way.
     
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  25. Everything Zen

    Everything Zen Well-Known Member

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    That’s exactly what I was trying to say. Thank you!
     
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  26. Shula

    Shula Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]
     
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  27. dicapr

    dicapr Well-Known Member

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    While it is important to advocate for yourself and get loud if necessary the issue is that the US has an overall poor maternal mortality rate period. Things are even worse for black women because of institutionalized racism. The main issue is physicaians with god-complex not listening and dismissing the concerns of their patients-women in general and black women in particular.

    To me the whole maternal death issue is summed up in the fact that a white L&D nurse died on the hospital floor she worked on after telling her co-workers and physicians something was wrong. Her husband-a doctor-tried to advocate for more testing for his wife and was told that OB wasn’t his specialty and was ignored. She died. So do we really thing getting “Ghetto” is the answer?
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2018
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  28. Chicoro

    Chicoro Well-Known Member

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    The documentation and literature explicitly state that a huge component of maternal death, as it relates to black women, along with empirical evidence, points to institutionalized racism as a tremendous, contributor to this crisis. This creates an allostatic load on African American woman which adversely impacts the body's adaptive systems. Many of the factors are impacting African American women not only during their lifespan, but even prior to their birth. The former referred to as the 'cumulative pathway model' and the latter as the 'early programming model'.

    I have read and studied the literature. That's just it. There is no simple answer.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2018
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  29. dicapr

    dicapr Well-Known Member

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    I agree-that was basically my point. The US doesn’t take care of women in general and black women are treated even worse than whites.
     
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  30. Chicoro

    Chicoro Well-Known Member

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    Understood!
     
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