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317 More Nigerian Girls Kidnapped From School

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.

Nigeria confronts second mass kidnapping of schoolchildren in nine days after 317 girls vanish​

ABUJA, Nigeria — Gunmen raided a boarding school in northwestern Nigeria early Friday and kidnapped more than 300 girls, marking the third mass abduction of children since December in Africa's most populous nation.

The assailants struck the Government Girls Secondary School in Zamfara state in a predawn ambush, teachers and residents said, waking up the town as shots rang out.
By daylight Friday, community members tallied the missing — 317 vanished into the night, local police said — while security forces scoured the area, which has been plagued by kidnappings in recent months.

“I wish to assure everyone that we are wholly committed to ensuring a speedy rescue of our dear schoolgirls,” Bello Matawalle, the Zamfara state governor, said in a special broadcast.

No one has asserted responsibility for the attack, but criminal gangs known as “bandits” are increasingly seizing groups for ransom — a menace that has prompted some Nigerians to call for a national state of emergency.

One of the girls’ guardians, Saidu Kwairo, said he watched from his window as pickup trucks roared into the town of Jangebe. The gunmen were firing their weapons into the air. “We could hear the helpless voices of the girls screaming,” he said, “amid the sounds of dangerous rifles.” The kidnapping comes nine days after attackers stormed another boarding school in north-central Nigeria, abducting more than 40 people, including 27 students. The Niger state victims all remain in captivity as authorities attempt to negotiate their release.

Between 2011 and 2020, Nigerians paid at least $18 million to liberate themselves or loved ones, according to a report from SB Morgen, a consulting firm that crunched data from open sources. Sixty percent of that amount was spent in the last half of that period, reflecting a troubling acceleration, the authors noted. Kidnappers formerly focused on wealthy people or foreigners — targets that promised bigger rewards. Over the past three years, though, the pattern has shifted: Practically anyone can be ripped out of their dwellings or off the streets in a string of northern states. Gunmen have even stopped public buses.

“Bandits have realized that the authorities cannot protect the people,” said Isa Sanusi, spokesman for Amnesty International in the Nigerian capital, Abuja. “That is lucrative. Ordinary people will give up all they have to save their families.” Striking boarding schools in poor areas is seen as a savvy financial move.
“The schools are almost always in a squalid state without much fencing,” Sanusi said. “Kidnapping the children gets them worldwide publicity, and governments are always looking for a quick way of rescuing them. Ransom payments are one of the only options.”

In December, Boko Haram claimed responsibility for capturing more than 300 boys from a school in the northwestern state of Katsina. The children were released days later under murky circumstances. Officials rarely say how they negotiate abductees’ freedom. The extremist group garnered notoriety for kidnapping more than 270 schoolgirls from the town of Chibok in 2014, sparking a viral social media campaign calling for their safe return: #BringBackOurGirls. More than 100 are still missing.

Although Boko Haram normally operates in the country’s northeast, analysts say gang members hundreds of miles away maintain relationships with fighters. The group has killed at least 36,000 people and displaced millions over the past decade from its stronghold in the Lake Chad Basin. Authorities are not sure whether the recent abductions were carried out by co-conspirators or copycats. Nigeria’s defense minister, Bashir Salihi Magashi, set off outrage this month after advising people not to “be cowards” and to defend themselves against kidnappers. “In our younger days, we stand to fight any aggression coming for us,” the retired army major general said in a statement. “I don’t know why people are running from minor things like that.”

But in Jangebe early Friday, residents said they feared for their lives. And no one had firearms to strike back. The eruption of gunfire seemed intentional, several said. Perhaps the attackers wanted people to hide inside their homes. “We thought they had come to attack residents as they usually do, but this time, unfortunately, they aimed at the students,” said a neighbor, 52-year-old Bello Maikusa Jangebe, who was startled awake by the gunfire. “We’ve noticed that only a few of the students were left behind.”
Garba reported from Kano, Nigeria. Ismail Alfa in Maiduguri, Nigeria, contributed to this report.
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
The answer to what to do about this situation lies in who is providing the money for these dudes to do what they do. Can Nigerians with knowledge of what's going on explain who is funding Boko Haram? Whenever I read about groups wanting to establish Islamic countries it smells like

but I fully admit to being biased.

The articles I've read say rich Nigerians and Nigerian politicians are funneling money to them but why would Nigerians pay other Nigerians to human traffic Nigerian kids? Let's be real, they are not abducting those girls to marry them off. Even though the boys abducted may be recruited, there's not a doubt in my mind a significant amount of them end up in the same situation as the girls.

So why is this happening?
 

Kanky

Well-Known Member
Nigeria’s defense minister, Bashir Salihi Magashi, set off outrage this month after advising people not to “be cowards” and to defend themselves against kidnappers. “In our younger days, we stand to fight any aggression coming for us,” the retired army major general said in a statement. “I don’t know why people are running from minor things like that.”
:look: Is this man asking why school children don’t just fight off kidnappers? :ohwell:
 

Ivonnovi

Well-Known Member
Though I've traveled the world enough to know better than to try to project my "Merica" experienced thinking on other countries.

I have to wonder what type of increased security measures are intact at these schools in Nigeria. Seems as though the schools are complacent, which they should not be because the girls parents are paying for their education.
 

Kanky

Well-Known Member
Though I've traveled the world enough to know better than to try to project my "Merica" experienced thinking on other countries.

I have to wonder what type of increased security measures are intact at these schools in Nigeria. Seems as though the schools are complacent, which they should not be because the girls parents are paying for their education.
They sent military after them instead of the police. I don’t think that a school is going to be able to protect itself from a group that can fight it out with the military. I don’t know what the solution is because this has been happening for years. Apparently the Nigerian government can’t or won’t just round up all of the terrorists and resolve this problem.
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
Though I've traveled the world enough to know better than to try to project my "Merica" experienced thinking on other countries.

I have to wonder what type of increased security measures are intact at these schools in Nigeria. Seems as though the schools are complacent, which they should not be because the girls parents are paying for their education.
What do you mean by this?
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
They sent military after them instead of the police. I don’t think that a school is going to be able to protect itself from a group that can fight it out with the military. I don’t know what the solution is because this has been happening for years. Apparently the Nigerian government can’t or won’t just round up all of the terrorists and resolve this problem.
This is part of the reason that the government/police being complicit doesn't seem off.
 

Ivonnovi

Well-Known Member
What do you mean by this?
What I meant was that I know that I should not look at this situation (in a Foreign country) and judge it by how we would handle it in the USA; or my community...............

Then in my next paragraph I questioned why the school wasn't taken actions that I know we'd deploy in the US.\\
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
What I meant was that I know that I should not look at this situation (in a Foreign country) and judge it by how we would handle it in the USA; or my community...............

Then in my next paragraph I questioned why the school wasn't taken actions that I know we'd deploy in the US.\\
Why would geography dictate your opinion on armed men forcing children out of school, taking them away from their parents and demanding
ransom?

Though I've traveled the world enough to know better than to try to project my "Merica" experienced thinking on other countries.

I asked for clarification of this because reading between the lines is a hint of some nuance detail about these Nigerian children and their families being traumatized by sociopaths and the school system being left in shambles that people in the U.S. simply cannot understand and should just mind they business.

The U.S. govt will likely mind it's business since there's no profit or much interest in saving Nigerian kids. I don't see why black woman (none of whom have armies to invade) talking about world politics involving black people need to stay away from the subject.
 

Ivonnovi

Well-Known Member
Why would geography dictate your opinion on armed men forcing children out of school, taking them away from their parents and demanding
ransom?



I asked for clarification of this because reading between the lines is a hint of some nuance detail about these Nigerian children and their families being traumatized by sociopaths and the school system being left in shambles that people in the U.S. simply cannot understand and should just mind they business.

The U.S. govt will likely mind it's business since there's no profit or much interest in saving Nigerian kids. I don't see why black woman (none of whom have armies to invade) talking about world politics involving black people need to stay away from the subject.
Hmmm, .....mmmmm Okay, I'll try to better express my thoughts.
I wrote: Though I've traveled the world enough.
My thoughts: I spent darn near 30 yrs in the military. .....

I wrote: enough to know better than to try to project my "Merica" experienced thinking on other countries.
My thoughts: I know what actions we'd take in the US., Especially if these were repeated actions. .....
My Experience: I did A LOT of Security/Counter terrorisim planning even before Sep 2011. After which the gov't started calling it Anti-terrorism planning. Shifting the mindset from Reactive to Proactive tactics

I wrote: I have to wonder what type of increased security measures are intact at these schools in Nigeria. Seems as though the schools are complacent, which they should not be because the girls parents are paying for their education.
My thoughts: Security measures should be increased. How does this keep happening? Who is ultimately responsible?
My Experience: Again, I did A LOT of Security/Counter terrorisim planning even before Sep 2011. "you can't afford to be complacent about security" I'm sure the girls parents feel helpless, heartbroken, and fearful. I know the Boko Group likes to use sex/rape as a tool of war.

@Kanky wrote: They sent military after them instead of the police. I don’t think that a school is going to be able to protect itself from a group that can fight it out with the military. I don’t know what the solution is because this has been happening for years. Apparently the Nigerian government can’t or won’t just round up all of the terrorists and resolve this problem.
@Crackers Phinn wrote: This is part of the reason that the government/police being complicit doesn't seem off. AND
Why would geography dictate your opinion on armed men forcing children out of school, taking them away from their parents and demanding ransom?

My Experience: The inaction or ineffective actions of the Police/Gov't does not come as a surprise me. I was not trying to avoid the subject of the traumatized girls. Perhaps my background caused me to more impulsively express my concerns about how this keeeeeps happening; and what if anything is being done to prevent or dare I say counter these attacks.
Though I didn't express it, My heart does goes out to the communities that are suffering these experiences, the young women will wear the scars of their experiences for a lifetime. I hope the predators and those that allow them to operate are round up and quickly given the Justice they've earned.
 

Leeda.the.Paladin

Well-Known Member
Why would geography dictate your opinion on armed men forcing children out of school, taking them away from their parents and demanding
ransom?
I don’t think she’s expressing an opinion about the act of the children being taken (obviously that’s horrible no matter where you live), I think she meant she didn’t want to project an American way of thinking on how the government there is handling the situation,especially when it keeps happening. @Ivonnovi I apologize if I am wrong
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
I wrote: enough to know better than to try to project my "Merica" experienced thinking on other countries.
My thoughts: I know what actions we'd take in the US., Especially if these were repeated actions. .....
My Experience: I did A LOT of Security/Counter terrorisim planning even before Sep 2011. After which the gov't started calling it Anti-terrorism planning. Shifting the mindset from Reactive to Proactive tactics
What action do you believe America would take if 300 children of any color were abducted and held for ransom from a school?

This should have been my original question.
 

Ivonnovi

Well-Known Member
What action do you believe America would take if 300 children of any color were abducted and held for ransom from a school?

This should have been my original question.
That's an interesting question.

Please don't forget that the U.S. traditionally has taken the stance that "We don't negotiate with terrorist's". We would make this statement, & officially support this statement, while at the same time looking to eliminate the terrorists, free the hostages, and eliminate the transfer of $$.

ETA: The paying of Ransom Fees to terrorist, often encourages them to use hostage taking as a form of Revenue. The US Federal Gov't does not want to embark down that rabbit hole. Think of the Malware folks that have taken over Government/Hospital Computer systems. Some pay, some don't and paying the ransom does not insure that they won't get hacked again; some have been Ransomed (Hacked) on more than one occasion.

AT A MINIMUM, I can say that:

1. All movement in the area would stop, or be screened. I'm talking roads, Mass transit, etc. This would severely limit their ability to skirt 300 children away.

2. Fortunately we have cameras that would pick up their movement. So Surveillance systems would be screened and Reward Offers would be high.

3. Random Acts of Increased Security would be implemented at all (or HVT High Value Target) schools.

AND,..... based on the recent raid on the Capitol

4. If they have a hidden and supportive network, 1-3 are band-aid or superficial actions; more leg work would have to be done to root out the perps. Think of Child Trafficking Investigations and the networks that exist on both sides of the Law.

5. ALSO, due to the bias' that exist in this country. I could almost assure you that actions would be swifter and more precise in areas where the targets are barely dusted with melanin. Also, if the terrorists are "barely dusted" too, the Officials, are more likely to define them as a Rouge Group, Fringe Group, Extremist Group, but would be very very hesitant to identify the group as Terrorists.
 
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Ivonnovi

Well-Known Member
I don’t think she’s expressing an opinion about the act of the children being taken (obviously that’s horrible no matter where you live), I think she meant she didn’t want to project an American way of thinking on how the government there is handling the situation,especially when it keeps happening. @Ivonnovi I apologize if I am wrong
You are Spot on!!!
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
This American's way of thinking of how the Nigerian government is handling the situation is that the government is getting their financial and/or religious zealotry cut of the kidnap and ransom game. Short of a thorough and lethal house cleaning done by Nigerians who are done playing with these fools, the world will still be seeing news articles about abductions 1-5-10-20-50 years from now.

BTW - They returned 279 of the 317 girls. One of the girls who escaped the abduction said the men who came in were dressed in military uniforms.
MAIDUGURI, Nigeria — Hundreds of girls who were abducted last week from their boarding school in Nigeria by a group of armed men have been released, a local official said on Tuesday, the second time in less than a week that gunmen have returned kidnapped schoolchildren in the country.
The girls were taken on Friday from Government Girls Secondary School in the town of Jangebe, in the northern state of Zamfara. The Nigerian government has denied paying ransoms. It was not clear how the release of the children in this case was secured.

“It gladdens my heart to announce the release of the abducted students of GGSS Jangebe from captivity,” the governor of Zamfara State, Bello Matawalle, wrote on Twitter early Tuesday, referring to their school’s name. Mr. Matawalle did not provide details about the girls’ release. Officials initially said that 317 girls had been in the group, but later told journalists that the correct number was 279. :nono: The frequency of mass kidnappings of girls and boys at boarding schools in northwestern Nigeria is rising in part because abduction has become a growth industry amid the country’s economic crisis. The victims are increasingly schoolchildren — not just the rich, powerful or famous.

One of Amiru Malan’s daughters was among the kidnapped. He said that as soon as he heard the gunfire after midnight on Friday, he knew what the armed men wanted. His home is only a short distance from a boarding school, where his two daughters lived in dorms. He knew the armed groups that have stalked schools in the region for months had come for his family.

“I became apprehensive and tried to contact friends and relatives within the neighborhood,” Mr. Malan said. “A friend of mine also a parent to another abducted schoolgirl, whose house is just next to the school, told me that our daughters’ school has been invaded.” His wife was by his side, “broken down in an inconsolable tears, calling out the names of our two daughters who are students in the affected school.” Mr. Malan tried to comfort her with prayer and waited for the dawn. “I headed to the school premises where two of my daughters are students,” he said.

“I saw my younger daughter, Maimunatu, who came running and crying,” he said. “I rushed to her and grabbed her firmly, hoping to hear that her older sister was safe, too. But Maimunatu shook her head and said, ‘They took her away.’ And she broke down in tears again.”
His daughter told him that the armed men were wearing uniforms and claimed to be with the military. “We have come to protect you,” she recalled them saying. “Don’t be afraid because we don’t mean to harm any of you, just obey our instructions.” Maimunatu, 13, hid under her bed and watched as her older sister, Khairiya, 14, was led away with hundreds of other girls. Three agonizing days later, the sisters were reunited.


The week before the girls were kidnapped, more than 40 children and adults were abducted from a boarding school in Niger State, becoming the latest victims of the West African country’s slide into insecurity. They were freed on Saturday. Hunting Grounds As Northern Nigeria’s kidnap-for-ransom industry grows, the new targets are poor villagers and ordinary schoolchildren. The banditry, one of Nigeria’s many complex conflicts, has even taken place in President Muhammadu Buhari’s home state, Katsina, where more than 300 boys were abducted by armed men in December. They, too, were later released.


Last week, Mr. Buhari blamed state and local governments for the recent uptick in kidnappings and urged them to improve security around schools.
On Tuesday, after the girls from the school in Zamfara State were returned, the state governor, Mr. Matawalle, struck a note of celebration.
“I enjoin all well-meaning Nigerians to rejoice with us as our daughters are now safe,” he wrote.
 

Rocky91

NYE side boob.
The world is organized around the oppression of women and girls. I’d tell any Nigerian woman that I could to apply for asylum with her daughters and get out of dodge while Nigerian men figure things out. And continue to allow the Chinese to recolonize the country. :look:

same message I’d share to Black women in any community anywhere around the world where BM have abdicated their responsibilities. Which is....almost everywhere.
 

naturalgyrl5199

Well-Known Member
This American's way of thinking of how the Nigerian government is handling the situation is that the government is getting their financial and/or religious zealotry cut of the kidnap and ransom game. Short of a thorough and lethal house cleaning done by Nigerians who are done playing with these fools, the world will still be seeing news articles about abductions 1-5-10-20-50 years from now.

BTW - They returned 279 of the 317 girls. One of the girls who escaped the abduction said the men who came in were dressed in military uniforms.
MAIDUGURI, Nigeria — Hundreds of girls who were abducted last week from their boarding school in Nigeria by a group of armed men have been released, a local official said on Tuesday, the second time in less than a week that gunmen have returned kidnapped schoolchildren in the country.
The girls were taken on Friday from Government Girls Secondary School in the town of Jangebe, in the northern state of Zamfara. The Nigerian government has denied paying ransoms. It was not clear how the release of the children in this case was secured.

“It gladdens my heart to announce the release of the abducted students of GGSS Jangebe from captivity,” the governor of Zamfara State, Bello Matawalle, wrote on Twitter early Tuesday, referring to their school’s name. Mr. Matawalle did not provide details about the girls’ release. Officials initially said that 317 girls had been in the group, but later told journalists that the correct number was 279. :nono: The frequency of mass kidnappings of girls and boys at boarding schools in northwestern Nigeria is rising in part because abduction has become a growth industry amid the country’s economic crisis. The victims are increasingly schoolchildren — not just the rich, powerful or famous.

One of Amiru Malan’s daughters was among the kidnapped. He said that as soon as he heard the gunfire after midnight on Friday, he knew what the armed men wanted. His home is only a short distance from a boarding school, where his two daughters lived in dorms. He knew the armed groups that have stalked schools in the region for months had come for his family.

“I became apprehensive and tried to contact friends and relatives within the neighborhood,” Mr. Malan said. “A friend of mine also a parent to another abducted schoolgirl, whose house is just next to the school, told me that our daughters’ school has been invaded.” His wife was by his side, “broken down in an inconsolable tears, calling out the names of our two daughters who are students in the affected school.” Mr. Malan tried to comfort her with prayer and waited for the dawn. “I headed to the school premises where two of my daughters are students,” he said.

“I saw my younger daughter, Maimunatu, who came running and crying,” he said. “I rushed to her and grabbed her firmly, hoping to hear that her older sister was safe, too. But Maimunatu shook her head and said, ‘They took her away.’ And she broke down in tears again.”
His daughter told him that the armed men were wearing uniforms and claimed to be with the military. “We have come to protect you,” she recalled them saying. “Don’t be afraid because we don’t mean to harm any of you, just obey our instructions.” Maimunatu, 13, hid under her bed and watched as her older sister, Khairiya, 14, was led away with hundreds of other girls. Three agonizing days later, the sisters were reunited.


The week before the girls were kidnapped, more than 40 children and adults were abducted from a boarding school in Niger State, becoming the latest victims of the West African country’s slide into insecurity. They were freed on Saturday. Hunting Grounds As Northern Nigeria’s kidnap-for-ransom industry grows, the new targets are poor villagers and ordinary schoolchildren. The banditry, one of Nigeria’s many complex conflicts, has even taken place in President Muhammadu Buhari’s home state, Katsina, where more than 300 boys were abducted by armed men in December. They, too, were later released.


Last week, Mr. Buhari blamed state and local governments for the recent uptick in kidnappings and urged them to improve security around schools.
On Tuesday, after the girls from the school in Zamfara State were returned, the state governor, Mr. Matawalle, struck a note of celebration.
“I enjoin all well-meaning Nigerians to rejoice with us as our daughters are now safe,” he wrote.
So it sounds like the gov't is paying them. What is the gov't getting return? Because returning "MOST" of them within 3 days makes no sense.
I guess "the return" is just knowing they don't have blood on their hands.
When the girls back during the Obama years (was it) were kidnapped they were not so lucky. Man the stories they told still give me chills.

Edited: I hate men and govt's. Gosh if women ruled the world.
 

Crackers Phinn

Either A Blessing Or A Lesson.
The world is organized around the oppression of women and girls. I’d tell any Nigerian woman that I could to apply for asylum with her daughters and get out of dodge while Nigerian men figure things out. And continue to allow the Chinese to recolonize the country. :look:

same message I’d share to Black women in any community anywhere around the world where BM have abdicated their responsibilities. Which is....almost everywhere.
The Googles says that the largest Nigerian populations outside of Nigeria are in Texas, Maryland and New York. I can't confirm the math but I did notice a ton of African restaurants in Houston. Maybe they need to call their American cousins'nem.
 
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